History of Madness – Track 3-4

Originally posted on Professor Keirsey's Blog:

Professor Keirsey had his lecture course on Madness taped on cassettes in 1982.  This post is the fourth (there was no third)  audio track.  More audio tracks will follow.

Track 1:  The beginning of History of Madness lecture course

He surveys the idea of madness “as far back as we can go”.  At the end of the course, he talks a little about his theory of madness: which he called at the time, “Wholistic Theory of Madness”  based social field theory and Temperament.

Once asked what was the most important thing he wanted people to get from his work, he said:

“I want people to understand that there is no such thing as madness.”

david_keirsey_in_library Dr. David West Keirsey

Track 3-4:

The revolting Freud.  Madness is defensive.

“These strange antics were seen as functional.  The mad act had a job to do.  It served a purpose. It had an end…

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History of Madness – Track 2

Originally posted on Professor Keirsey's Blog:

Professor Keirsey had his lecture course on Madness taped in 1982.  This post is the second audio track.  More audio tracks will follow.

Track 1:  The beginning of History of Madness lecture course

He surveys the idea of madness “as far back as we can go”.  At the end of the course, he talks a little about his theory of madness.

Once asked what was the most important thing he wanted people to get from his work, he said:

“I want people to understand that there is no such thing as madness.”

david_keirsey_in_library

Track 2:  Witches and Sorcerers. 17th century the advent of Mesmerism. Somnambulism, 19th century. The belief of illness.  The idea of suggestion.  Hypnotism.  The Classifiers.  Greeklish.  Bad Organs.

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Mary Lee – Australia’s Unsung Suffragette

Originally posted on Random Phoughts:

Day 283 of Colourisation Project – February 14

Challenge: to publish daily a colourised photo that has some significance around the day of publication.

Australia led the world in giving women not only the right to vote but also the right to stand for parliament. South Australia holds the distinction of being the first place on Earth to allow women access to parliament not just through the vote but through women becoming members of parliament themselves.

Instrumental in this landmark achievement was Mary Lee an Irish-Australian suffragette and social reformer in South Australia. Born this day, 14 February, 1821, Lee was the chief organiser of the 1894 petition of 11,600 signatures presented to the South Australian Parliament in August 1894, requesting that women in the Colony be granted the right to vote.

Mary LeePhotographer Unknown ~ Mary Lee c 1895 ~ Coloured by Loredana Crupi

Lee was born in county Monoghan…

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The History of Madness — Track 1

Originally posted on Professor Keirsey's Blog:

Professor Keirsey had his lecture course on Madness taped in 1982.  This is the first audio track.  More audio tracks will follow.

He surveys the idea of madness “as far back as we can go”.  At the end of the course, he talks a little about his theory of madness.

Once asked what was the most important thing he wanted people to get from his work, he said:

“I want people to understand that there is no such thing as madness.”

david_keirsey_in_library

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New Google Doodle Honors Anna Atkins, Photography Pioneer

Originally posted on TIME:

To celebrate what would have been the 216th birthday of Anna Atkins, a new Google Doodle features images of leaves reminiscent of the botanist’s groundbreaking contribution to photography.

Atkins used a version of “sun-printing” to create a book of photographed botanical specimens. Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions was self-published in 1843 and is considered to be the first book illustrated with photographs.

The method Atkins used for developing photos is called the Cyanotype technique. It is an iron-based chemical method that creates a white image appearing on a blue background. Exposure to sunlight is required for the process to work correctly, hence “sun-printing.”

Through her career, Atkins collected hundreds of specimens and in 1865 she donated her entire collection to the British Museum.

Born in Kent, southern England, on March 16, 1799, Atkins was raised by her father, a respected scientist, after her mother died during her daughter’s…

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Inequality in Language

Originally posted on bullyinginlanguage:

The blog on Bullyingin language was meant to be complete in itself to invite readers to look at language from a different perspective. A large part of what was done to language by patriarchy and its Lords is discussed and described on the site inequalityinlanguage.com  Click the titles in this site in their numbered order to get a logical sequence of how language was developed by patriarchy to safeguard and guarantee their power, wealth and control. 

Also included on this inequalityinlanguage.com are a few suggestions on what to do to make patriarchy shrink by reducing its lies and its violence embedded in every day language. My hope is that it will become clear that we all have a responsibility in getting rid of patriarchy.  It cannot be eradicated except through collective action.  We must all speak the language of truths, the language based on evidence, about reality-as-it-is and our…

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