History of Madness – Track 6

Professor Keirsey's Blog

Professor Keirsey had his lecture course on Madness taped on cassettes in 1982.  This post is the sixth audio track.  Some parts of the lectures are missing.  But, more audio tracks will follow.

Track 1:  The beginning of History of Madness lecture course

He surveys the idea of madness “as far back as we can go”.  At the end of the course, he talks a little about his theory of madness: which he called at the time, “Wholistic Theory of Madness”  based social field theory and Temperament.

Once asked what was the most important thing he wanted people to get from his work, he said:

“I want people to understand that there is no such thing as madness.”

david_keirsey_in_library Dr. David West Keirsey

Track 6:

The last part of elementalism
Role theory: Adler, Moreno, Sullivan, Kelly, Ellis, Berne
Programs, Drama, Game, Script, Lifeline

Eric Berne: Hydraulics and Electronic.  Robot Theory.

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History of Madness – Track 5

Professor Keirsey's Blog

Professor Keirsey had his lecture course on Madness taped on cassettes in 1982.  This post is the fifth audio track.  More audio tracks will follow.

Track 1:  The beginning of History of Madness lecture course

He surveys the idea of madness “as far back as we can go”.  At the end of the course, he talks a little about his theory of madness: which he called at the time, “Wholistic Theory of Madness”  based social field theory and Temperament.

Once asked what was the most important thing he wanted people to get from his work, he said:

“I want people to understand that there is no such thing as madness.”

david_keirsey_in_library Dr. David West Keirsey

Track 5:

Revolutions: slow ideas in Science.
Why people hold on to old fast ideas, and attack the new slow idea.

Kretschmer, Shapiro, Angel.  Madness in Character.  Rausch.  Disorders of Communication.

Penultimate Step: Haley

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Libertarian women’s history month: Suzanne La Follette

The Insomniac Libertarian

Suzanne Clara La Follette (June 24, 1893 – April 23, 1983) was an American journalist and author who advocated for libertarian feminism in the first half of the 20th century. As an editor she helped found several magazines. She was an early and ardent feminist and a vocal anti-communist.  Much of her career from the 30s to the mid-50s consisted of trying to find financial backing for a series of libertarian magazines, first working for Albert Jay Nock and then hiring him as a contributor, in a relationship slightly like that of Joan Kennedy Taylor and Roy A. Childs, Jr.   The Freeman, still published today by the Foundation for Economic Education, is the surviving publication of her career.  Like Zora Neale Hurston, she seems to have had little or no contact with Rose Wilder Lane, Isabel Patterson, or Ayn Rand.  One can only imagine what might…

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